Les Parfums de Rosine La Cologne de Rosine ~ fragrance review

Les Parfums de Rosine La Cologne de Rosine

Today was one of those hot-hazy-and-humid summer days in New York when the air had a palpable, spongy weight, the subway stations could only be described as “infernal,” and every trash receptacle was emitting its own unique stench. As a consequence, everyone was sweaty and miserable, and everyone — including me — was in a bad mood. One of the small comforts of my day was a sample vial of La Cologne de Rosine, the latest release from Les Parfums de Rosine, which refreshed me at a moment when I couldn’t have tolerated my usual powdery or spicy-sweet floral fragrances.

La Cologne de Rosine is a rose-tinted interpretation of a traditional Eau de Cologne, with notes of bergamot, mandarin, rose, freesia, violet, white musk, cedar and amber. It was developed for Rosine by perfumer Nicolas Bonneville. If you’ve read Robin’s recent posts on “old school” and “new wave” summer colognes, you may be in the mood to break out your own favorite colognes, regardless of the weather…

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Acqua di Parma Rosa Nobile and Les Parfums de Rosine Ballerina No. 1 ~ perfume reviews

Pink rose

My last review of a rose-centered fragrance was posted way back in June, if you can believe it or not. (It was a review of Maria Candida Gentile’s Cinabre, which would actually make an excellent fall fragrance.) What’s become of me? To remedy this situation, here’s a double review of two newish rose fragrances from brands that have been around for a while.

The Italian house Acqua di Parma has just released Rosa Nobile, “a tribute to the ‘Queen of flowers'” that includes top notes of Sicilian mandarin, Calabrian bergamot and pepper; peony, violet, lily of the valley and Centifolia rose in the heart; and base notes of cedarwood, ambergris and musk. The Acqua di Parma website features an entire page focusing on Rosa Nobile’s story. It mentions Rosa Nobile’s “brand new and modern personality,” because — of course — the consumer must be assured that there’s nothing dowdy about roses…

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