Boy Chanel ~ fragrance review & a quick Chanel poll

Arthur Capel

Boy Chanel joins the Les Exclusifs collection at Chanel this year, bringing the collection to 16.1 It’s the second Exclusif from house perfumer Olivier Polge (the first being Misia), and was inspired by Arthur “Boy” Capel. Boy Capel, an English polo player and businessman, would likely be forgotten today but for his 9-year affair with Coco Chanel — he is often cited as the true love of her life.1 That, of course, lends him massive potential as “another link in the grand construct of the Chanel story”.2 I don’t know exactly how many products he has accrued at this point, but his namesake lipstick (in the Rouge Coco Shine line) came out in 2011, and his namesake handbag, Le Boy Chanel, debuted in 2012 (and was called an “instant classic”). Now, he has a fragrance.

It’s a unisex, with the usual hedging about unisex…

Read the rest of this article »

Shop for perfume

Parfums Raffy

We can be much more precise today than we used to be

There are also nods to classic jasmine, aldehyde, sandalwood, and ylang-ylang in the new scent — and that’s where things get interesting. Polge isolated the ylang-ylang using a special distilling process. The result is a greener, crisper note than anything you'd find in the original. “Natural, raw ingredients are almost fragrances by themselves,” says Polge. “We can be much more precise today than we used to be, and we have the ability of redistilling the concentrate.” He also kept sandalwood, but balanced it with a lighter, “more vibrant” cedarwood for a crisper, softer dry-down.

— Perfumer Olivier Polge provides a few more details about the upcoming Chanel No. 5 L'Eau. Read more at Stop Everything: Chanel Is Launching A New N0 .5 at Refinery 29.

Chanel Chance, Chance Eau Tendre & Chance Eau Vive ~ fragrance review

Chanel Chance Eau Vive

Have you noticed the trend of young women dying their hair gray? It can be startling to see a baby face capped with grandma’s hair. Sometimes it comes off as chic. But sometimes it’s an epic fail, almost as unsettling as politicians who dye their hair nut brown when Mother Nature clearly determined it should be gray — or gone. Mutton dressed as lamb, and vice versa.

To me, Chanel Chance plays this game. It doctors a big girl’s perfume for little girls by simplifying its heady oriental notes, freshening it up with citrus, and targeting its marketing to younger women. It’s like Guerlain Shalimar drawn as a kid’s cartoon and squirted with sweet musk, or like Thierry Mugler Angel with less verve and voluptuousness. To me, Chance feels off-kilter — or worse, banal. But, like dying your hair gray, it has its fans.

Chance, created by Jacques Polge, launched in 2002…

Read the rest of this article »